Posts Tagged: journalism

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penamerican:

‘Hear me roar’: Women journalists claim their voice in the Great Lakes
On March 8th, Search launched its “Media: A Voice for All” initiative in Rwanda, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The project will extend to the Central African Republic and the Republic of Congo in the near future.
The program has two objectives:
1. Increase the number of female journalists in the Great Lakes region of Africa
2. Improve gender-sensitivity in media coverage, especially on women’s issues
To reach these goals, Search is partnering with local women’s media associations in each country. The program will provide training sessions, capacity building instruction, innovation grants, sensitization activities, and networking development.

penamerican:

‘Hear me roar’: Women journalists claim their voice in the Great Lakes

On March 8th, Search launched its “Media: A Voice for All” initiative in Rwanda, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The project will extend to the Central African Republic and the Republic of Congo in the near future.

The program has two objectives:

1. Increase the number of female journalists in the Great Lakes region of Africa

2. Improve gender-sensitivity in media coverage, especially on women’s issues

To reach these goals, Search is partnering with local women’s media associations in each country. The program will provide training sessions, capacity building instruction, innovation grants, sensitization activities, and networking development.

Source: thecommongroundblog.com
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penlive:

Mohamed Keita, Agnes Taile, and Kessahun Yilma discuss press freedom in Africa at the CUNY graduate school of journalism. PEN recently worked with Committee to Protect Journalists and Internet Without Borders to release a report on free expression in Cameroon. Gary Pierre Pierre, founder of the Haitian Times, moderates.

Source: penlive
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2012 Knight Fellow Aaron Huey

Do you have an innovative idea to help build a new future for journalism?

Would you like to spend 10 months experimenting, testing and creating your idea, leveraging the many resources of Stanford University and Silicon Valley — and get paid to do so?

Are you a journalist or journalism entrepreneur who wants to gain new skills and broaden your perspectives while collaborating with a group of 20 top-notch journalists from around the world?

Applications are now open for the 2013-14 class of John S. Knight Journalism Fellows at Stanford University.

The deadline for international applications is Dec. 1, 2012; the deadline for U.S. applications is Jan. 15, 2013.

Source: knight.stanford.edu
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PowerReporting FA

Monday to Wednesday 29 – 31st October
Wits University, Johannesburg.

BOOKING NOW OPEN!

This year we welcome ◊ Heather Brook on her  dispatches from the information war – journalism in a digital age ◊ Gabriel Tabatchiek and the team from Brazil who ran the Secret Diaries and brought down a government  ◊ Ying Chan from China where investigative journalism thrives and how  journalists use weibei (China’s twitter)  ◊ Former AU rapporteur on freedom of expression Pansy Tlakula will give the  inaugural Carlos Cardosa lecture ◊ Tim Butcher – why good writing matters ◊ Mzilikazi wa Afrika andStephan Hofstatteron the danagers of investigating the police in  the Cato Manor death squad ◊ Julian Rademeyer will talk about launch his book on rhino poaching Killing for Profit  ◊ Athandiwa Saba on filing your freedom of information request ◊ Kassim Mohammed writing about terrorism in East Africa ◊ Follow the money with Rob Rose 

Courses include: ◊ Data journalism from beginners to advanced  ◊ Tell your story, from a good opening to a the last full stop (or the credits)  ◊ How to follow the money ◊ Mining in Africa  ◊ Agricultural policy across Africa  ◊ Journalists and the law – libel and defamation,  the Protection of Information Bill ◊

Source: journalism.co.za
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atavist:

Joe Sacco and the rise of “longform comics reportage.” (Just a few weeks until our own foray into this exciting new genre!)

Source: atavist
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darienlibrary:

usnatarchives:

Reporters race through the White House to be the first to break the news of the Japanese surrender after President Truman’s announcement of the unconditional surrender of Japan, which ended World War II.

Images: Photographs taken by Abbie Rowe. From the holdings of the Truman Presidential Library. (August 14, 1945).

Heh. And nowadays they’d just be racing to their smart phones and complaining about the WiFi.

Source: research.archives.gov
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onthemedia:

Two Thursday morning recommendations: Brooke’s book and coffee.

ordinarymachines:

GLADSTONE: Michael Herr was 27 when he covered Vietnam for Esquire in 1967. Ten years later, he published a profound and graphic depiction of the war. 

The grunts were often warm, but sometimes he felt impersonal hatred, as one might hate a parasite…

HERR: They only hated me … the way you’d hate any hopeless fool who would put himself through this thing when he had choices … Any fool who had no more need of his life than to play with it in this way.

Once he overhears a rifleman airing that disgust in vivid terms…

[Press vehicle shown in background.]

RIFLEMAN: Those fucking guys … I hope they die.

But Herr said reporters also feared a different kind of death…

HERR: We all knew that if you stayed too long you became one of those poor bastards who had to have a war on all the time … I didn’t know — it took the war to teach it — that you were as responsible for everything you saw as you were for everything you did. 

GLADSTONE: To well and truly report a war — amidst official lies, commercial pressures, horror, trauma, principles, and patriotism — is to be at war with oneself. Objectivity is essential.

GLADSTONE: Objectivity is impossible. 

(via wnyc)

Source: newsfrompoems
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Pwning the Media

futurejournalismproject:

Much has been written about how we can verify sources and information in a social media age.

Not so much about how journalists — like most human creatures — are a rather lazy group and say, for instance, might skip a step or three in the process of story assignment to story publication.

Which is what Ryan Holiday took advantage of as he became an expert on pretty much all things reporters happened to need an expert on when reporting their stories.

Using Help A Reporter Out, an online network that connects reporters with expert sources, Holiday responded to pretty much anyone seeking a comment or opinion about pretty much any topic. He even had an assistant help get through his inbox deluge.

Via Forbes:

Holiday, 25 years old and based in New Orleans, mostly wanted to see if it could be done. He had been getting blogs to write what he wanted for years, and had developed a sense of how stories were put together in the internet age. He thought he could push the envelope a bit further…

…He used Help a Reporter Out (HARO), a free service that puts sources in touch with reporters. Basically, a reporter sends a query, and a slew of people wanting to comment on the story email back. He decided to respond to each and every query he got, whether or not he knew anything about the topic. He didn’t even do it himself — he enlisted an assistant to use his name in order to field as many requests as humanly possible.

He expected it to take a few months of meticulous navigation, but he found himself with more requests than he could handle in a matter of weeks. On Reuters, he became the poster child for “Generation Yikes.” On ABC News, he was one of a new breed of long-suffering insomniacs. At CBS, he made up an embarrassing office story, at MSNBC he pretended someone sneezed on him while working at Burger King. At Manitouboats.com, he offered helpful tips for winterizing your boat. The capstone came in the form of a New York Times piece on vinyl records — naturally, Holiday doesn’t collect vinyl records.

During the course of Holiday’s “experiment” he says he was fact-checked once, by email, to confirm whether he really was Ryan Holiday.

As Peter Shankman, founder of Help a Reporter Out, tells Forbes, HARO is just a tool. “As a journalist, it’s always been your job to do your research and check the source, whether you find that source on the street, on Craigslist or on HARO,” he says. “If you’re not doing that, you’re not doing your job however you find the source.”

Source: futurejournalismproject
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"Spend a week reading Haiti news sources and look for the overuse of the future tense, i.e. someone will do some Thing, someone is planning to, someone is donating, some Thing is being [insert verb here], a law will be passed, etc. It’s like reading air, all this text dedicated to future plans but not one word dedicated to evaluating whether the announced thing worked."

Source: ht.ly